How to Get Bereavement Leave and What to Do When You’re Out of Time>>

 

If you’re like most working parents, you likely have a lot on your mind when you return home from work each day. You don’t just want to hang out with the kids, you want time to get things done around the house. Time to relax and decompress. And leave time for your grief-stricken partner, kids, or other family members who need grieving help too. Unfortunately, the demands of parenthood often take up more time than is available during the week — at least for those of us who work from home. That’s why having access to paid leave can be so helpful in coping with life changes like a parent’s death or a difficult divorce. Bereavement leave is also known as “personal days” or “personal time,” and it is legal in the U.S.

What is bereavement leave?

Bereavement leave is the legal right to take time off work when a loved one dies or is laid off. The law designates this leave as “personal days,” which means it’s time off the clock but it doesn’t count against an employee’s vacation or sick leave. Personal days are unpaid time off.

Why is getting bereavement leave important?

Bereavement Leave: Because “I'm Sorry for Your Loss” Isn't Enough

Getting paid time off after a death or other major life change can be challenging for employees. Even if you have access to paid leave, you may not know when you’ll get a chance to take it. Some emergencies, like a car accident, might require you to take action very quickly. Others, like a parent’s death or medical emergency, are more delays. With paid time off policies almost universally required these days, it can be easy to forget how important bereavement leave is. It’s not the same as saying you can’t take the time off because you’re emotional or you just don’t want to. You can still take the time off and still be able to focus on your job.

What situations qualify as bereavement leave?

What Is Bereavement Leave? A Guide for Global Compliance

Any death in the immediate family — spouse, children, parents, grandchildren, or siblings — is valid grounds for bereavement leave. Likewise, a major medical event, such as a heart attack or cancer diagnosis, would also qualify. Significant life changes, such as the loss of a job, significant life events, or a parent, grandparent, or loved one’s death, would also qualify. To get the full benefit of bereavement leave, it’s important to let your boss know you’re taking time off. Here are a few situations where you might get paid bereavement leave: The death of your spouse or partner. A close friend’s death. A medical emergency at work. A significant life change, such as the loss of a job or significant life event The death of a child. The birth of a child. If death or significant life change takes place in your home state, you’re also allowed to take bereavement leave.

When to get bereavement leave and when not to

Bereavement Leave: How to Prepare for the Unexpected

If you take bereavement leave after a death or major life change, you should try to take it as soon as possible. The earlier you get it, the less stress it will cause for the remaining family members and the employee who has to take it. If you have to take bereavement leave after a death or major life change, your best bet is to schedule it at the same time every week. That way, you won’t have to think about it so much and can focus on your grieving process instead. If you have to take bereavement leave during a certain part of the week, that’s not a deal-breaker. You can take it any other day of the week. If you have to take it on a certain day of the week,

If you have to take bereavement leave, the first thing you should do is take care of your own needs. That means eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, and keeping active. If you have time during your break to do so, go ahead and take care of your own needs. But make sure you take your time. If you have to take the time off because of a death in the family, you don’t want to rush through it. Take your time, eat a healthy meal, and relax. And don’t miss any calls from your partner or kids — or any other family member for that matter.

Wrapping up: Is getting paid time off worth it?

Employee Paid Time Off (PTO) Policy Template | Workablef

If you’re like most working parents, you have plenty on your mind when you return home from work each day. You don’t just want to hang out with the kids, you want time to get things done around the house. Time to relax and decompress. And leave time for your grief-stricken partner, kids, or other family members who need grieving help too. Unfortunately, the demands of parenthood often take up more time than is available during the week — at least for those of us who work from home. That’s why having access to paid leave can be so helpful in coping with life changes like a parent’s death or a difficult divorce.

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